History of Playing Cards

Playing cards are one of the oldest forms of ‘toys’ created by man and can be used for a variety of different purposes. Gambling, magic and tarot reading are a few examples of the use of these cards. They can come in either special ply paper, thin cardboard, plastic and in some cases, thin metal.

A ‘deck’ or ‘pack’ of cards has 52 playing cards in it, with an additional 2 cards named ‘Jokers’. There are 4 suits or ‘types’ of cards in a deck. These are the Clubs, Hearts, Spades and Diamonds. Within each suit, there are 13 different cards, Consisting of the Ace, Numbers 2-10, the Jack, Queen and King (the ‘Court’ or ‘Picture’ cards). These values are printed on one side, while a consistent design is printed on the back.

Throughout time, many forms of games have been created. Some include Go Fish, Hearts, Solitaire, Big-2 and Poker. These are all interactive games that can be played by one person or a group of people. Gypsies and Fortune Tellers have also been known to use cards or ‘Tarot Cards’ as an extension to predict the future.

The main and most popular production company of playing cards is the United States Playing Card Company, formerly based in Cincinnati, Ohio but moved to Erlanger, Kentucky. They are known for their popular and internationally recognized brand ‘Bicycle’ and ‘Bee’ cards. Which is made of 3 ply paper coated with an ‘Air Cushion’ finish which makes them slick and glide beautifully without the cards being able to stick to one another.

Fun Facts

Did you know that the simple deck of cards lie hidden secrets and associations to human culture? For starters, the deck consists of 52 cards, exactly the number of weeks in a year. The 4 suits represent the 4 seasons of Summer, Autumn, Winter and Spring. With the Court cards representing 11, 12 and 13 respectively to the Jack, Queen and King, All of the 52 cards in a deck add up to 365, the exact number of days in a year. The Ace of Spades typically represents death.

Flushes Gone Wild – Can’t Beat the Dealer With a Poker Hand? Beat ’em With More Flush Cards

Flushes Gone Wild is a casino table game where players do not have to understand any poker hand rankings to play. It is very easy to learn. As long as you can count and know the difference between the four suits: Hearts, Diamonds, Clubs, and Spades, you’re good to go.

About Flushes Gone Wild

This poker game is played with a standard 52 card deck and a house dealer.The only rank while playing is the amount of cards with the same suit in one hand. Any hand with two or more cards of the same suit are flush cards. If two or more hands have the same number of flush cards, then the ranks of the individual cards shall determine the higher hand.

Aces are always high, and all Deuces are Wild. A Deuce of any suit counts as a flush card in both the player and dealer hands. The objective for the player is to have a higher amount of flush cards than the dealer in order to win.

How to Play

Players must first make an Ante and Blind wager of equal amounts. An optional Flush Rush wager may also be made. The player and dealer each receive five cards face down. Two Community Cards are also dealt face down in the center of the table which can be used by the player and dealer to complete their flush hands.

After the player examines his or her cards, one of two decisions must be made:

  • Fold, forfeiting all wagers
  • Make a Play wager at two times the Ante.

The players with then make their best flush hands. After all the players have acted, the dealer will then reveal his or her cards and the community cards. The winning pay table is determined by the margin of victory between player and dealer hands. For example: If the player has a four card flush and the dealer has a two card flush, then the margin of victory for the player is 2. The Ante and Play bets pay even money, while the Blind wager pays according to the margin of victory table as follows:

Blind Pay Table

If the margin of victory is:

  • 5 pays 200/1
  • 4 25/1
  • 3 5/1
  • 2 3/1
  • 1 or 0. Push

The house edge for the Ante and Blind wagers is calculated at about 3.7%.

Optional Flush Rush

  • 7 card natural. pays 250/1
  • 7 card wild. 100/1
  • 6 card natural 50/1
  • 6 card wild 10/1
  • 5 card natural 6/1
  • 4 card natural 1/1
  • All other loss

If the Flush Rush bet is made, the house edge jumps to about 8.6%.

The following simple strategy is recommended for this game:

  • Play all hands that include at least a three card flush and/or at least one deuce.
  • Play if a two card flush has at least a Queen high.

Good Luck!

DJ Wild Poker – Now There’s a Casino Table Game That Offers All Deuces and a Joker As Wild Cards

DJ Wild (Deuces, Joker) Poker is a casino table game where players play against a house dealer. The objective of course is for the player to have a higher poker hand than the dealer in order to win.

The game is played with a standard 52 card deck plus one Joker. The unique offering is that the four Deuces and the one Joker serve as wild cards, which can be substituted for any card to improve the hand.

How DJ Wild Poker is Played

Players must first make (2) equal bets in the Ante and Blind positions. An optional Trips wager is also available which pays if won even if the player loses the hand to the dealer.

Each player and dealer receive five cards face down.After reviewing the cards, the player makes one of two choices: (1) Fold, forfeiting the Ante and Blind wagers. (2) Make a Play bet at 2X the Ante. The player then tucks the played cards face down under the wager.

The dealer will then reveal his or her cards, and in turn will compare the hand to the players’ hands that made the Play wager.

If the dealer beats the player, the ante, Blind, and Play bets lose. If the dealer and player tie, the Ante, Blind, and Play bets push. If the player beats the dealer, the Ante and Play bets pay even money, and the Blind bet pays according to the following table:

Hand Payout

Five Wilds. 1000/1

Royal Flush 50/1

Five of a Kind 10/1

Straight Flush. 9/1

Four of a Kind 4/1

Full House 3/1

Flush 2/1

Straight 1/1

All Other Push

Optional Trips Bet

The Winning Trips wager pays according to the poker value of the player’s hand providing the player has at least 3 of a Kind. There are two separate pay tables, one without and one with wild cards. Payout amounts may vary between jurisdictions. Here is a common table:

Natural

Royal Flush – 1000/1

Straight Flush – 200/1

Four of a Kind – 90/1.

Full House – 40/1

Flush – 25/1

Straight – 20/1

Three of a Kind – 6/1

Wild

Five Wilds – 2000/1

Royal Flush – 100/1

Five of a Kind – 100/1

Straight Flush – 30/1

Four of a Kind – 6/1

Full House – 5/1

Flush – 4/1

Straight – 3/1

Three of a Kind – 1/1

Another optional upgrade wager that’s available in some jurisdictions is the Two Way Bad Beat. (A bad beat is when you get beat and get paid.) In this option the player must have Three of a Kind or better without a tie. If the player loses to the dealer. The pay table pays the following:

Royal Flush – 10,000/1

Five of a Kind – 10/000/1

Straight Flush – 5,000/1

Four of a Kind – 500/1

Full House – 400/1

Flush – 300/1

Straight – 100/1

Three of a Kind – 9/1

Strategy and House Edge

Strategy for this game is to raise with any pair of 4’s or better, otherwise fold. The house edge is calculated at about 3.5%.

Craps With Cards Vs Craps With Dice

There are laws in place in certain states where an outcome may not be determined through a toss of the dice. This means Craps games, as we know them, are prohibited. However, clever casino operators have installed Craps games using cards instead of dice. Contrary to popular belief, this is a great opportunity because it offers an advantage to the player that is not available in a standard dice game of Craps.

The game of Craps played with cards is played exactly as is Craps with dice. The table layout is the same (with the possible addition of two colored boxes that determine the shoe to be used. You can also bet on those colored boxes.

The casino uses cards numbered ace through six (1 – 6) instead of dice. They also use a shuffle machine known as a “constant shuffle machine” because they don’t bury cards as they are exposed, instead, they are immediately returned to the shuffle machine (that’s why it’s called constant). The same cards used to get a point on the come out roll may not be available to be drawn again until a new shelf is hit, making it disproportionately likely to throw a seven instead, resulting in a win for the wrong bettor. Remember that fact – we’ll use it later.

After the point is established, two more cards are dealt to represent the next roll of the dice. That continues until the point is made or the “shooter” sevens out.

For the purpose of this article, I’m not going into the rules and/or strategies of the game of Craps. I’m assuming you already know them, and the purpose of this article is to point out differences and similarities of the Craps game played with cards as opposed to the dice Craps game.

The short and very sweet difference between the two is this: there is a very distinct and big advantage to playing Craps with cards if you are a “wrong bettor”. You, the player, actually have the advantage over the casino and that is not found in any other game nor in any dice version of Craps.

Conversely there is a bigger advantage for the house if you’re a “right bettor”.

Is there any question as to how you should play the card version of Craps? The answer is obvious – you must be a wrong bettor. Put aside all objections you ever had to betting with the house and against the shooter. You are playing Craps to make money – not friends.

Why are the wrong bettors now in a position of positive odds? In other words, why do we players have an advantage over the casino? That’s unheard of – after all, there are strategies that get the house advantage down towards “0” where the house advantage is small (in dice Craps as well as in other games), but nowhere at any time has the player actually had the advantage over the house – until now.

Here’s the amazing news:

first, as stated above, the cards that established the point cannot be used again during a shooter’s attempts to make the point. This makes a seven even more likely to come up before the point, resulting in a win. That’s important, but that’s not the best part…

In a game of Craps played with dice, laying odds is the way we get the overall odds against winning down to the lowest (best) number possible. That means we can reduce the house advantage to near zero.

However, in a game of Craps played with cards, by knowing when to lay odds against a number and how much to lay against a number, we get the odds down, past zero and into a very healthy advantage for the player. Here are the numbers:

laying odds against a 4 or 10 in a dice Craps game, results in zero advantage to the house (after figuring the don’t pass and or the don’t come – the actual odds give the advantage to the house: 1.364)

but, laying odds against the 4 or 10 in a card Craps game has the house advantage at -0.253. Yep – that is a negative number, and thus the advantage goes to the player – absolutely unheard of! California casinos like the Viejas in San Diego generously offer 10x odds (up to $1,000 winnings), so you should take full advantage of maximum odds against a 4 and 10.

Laying odds against a 5 or 9 in both games remains at zero – no advantage to the house nor to the player. So, lay your “normal” odds against a 5 or 9.

Laying odds against a 6 or 8 in a dice Craps game, results in zero advantage to the house.

But, laying odds against the 6 or 8 in a card Craps game has the house advantage at -0.207. Yep, another advantage for the player! Again, in California, lay maximum odds.

So, if the player laid the maximum odds on points of 4, 6, 8, and 10, then the overall player edge between the don’t pass and laying odds would be +0.022%. That’s amazing!

So, take advantage of this golden opportunity, and gratefully play Craps with cards instead of dice!